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English 106
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 106 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 3:00pm EDT
to have anita thompson here, from mississippi, because 48 years ago, there were drive-by shootings at headstart programs in her state, and some toloyers were threatening not send their children to headstart. we have come some way, and we have a ways to go. and earlyeadstart childhood education programs were serving a scant 40% of all eligible children. waiting lists or long. -- were long. rising fixed costs and rent, energy. we have almost always operated at the margins because it seems inconceivably -- inconceivable not to spend every available dollar on providing the best quality program for every possible child. when the unthinkable happened and sequestration became the new reality this march, we had little left to cut. you recently saw -- you have likely seen the recent report that over 57,000 fewer children will be served in head start and early head start next year because of the sequester. this is not a small number. numbercrunching thinkers in our team figured out that 57,000 people would fill a football stadium at the university of louisville. they would fill 1900 school m
FOX Business
Aug 28, 2013 7:00pm EDT
nation may be more divided than back then. i am from mississippi. my father worked heavily to desegregate schools in mississippi. my mother did not have a black high school, my about father had to build it. lori: as reverend jesse jack jackson pointed out, african-americans are freer but less equal. >> that does reflect my sentiment. unemployment in black community is on the increase. we -- >> 12-point 6%. black unemployment. versus 6.6, reverend. >> it is not just a black problem. there are disparities in other communities, they have benefitted by that movement. i think all of us have to get engaged. not just a government problem. that is a key point president obama mentioned. everyone has to get involved am 73% of children born out of wedlock that is the government, some individuals need to hear what is happening at their children, in living rooms, men and women need to take responsibility. >> lori, reverend is right, government is supposed to protect the consumer, but up to individual responsibility, "it takes a village" to raise a child. with everything going on in the communities, we
ABC
Aug 26, 2013 5:30pm PDT
in mississippi. >> we can do 400,000. >> reporter: 400,000 in one day? >> pounds, yes. >> that is a lot of fish. >> that is a lot of fish. >> reporter: he's one of the biggest catfish processors in the country and one of the driving forces for getting the u.s. department of agriculture to inspect catfish grown here and imported. critics call that a huge waste of taxpayer money. there is one big problem. >> you already have the fda inspecting seafood. >> that's not correct. we have fda but that's a nonexistent inspection. >> reporter: believe it or not, two federal agencies are supposed to inspect the same fish. the usda spent $20 million just for planning those inspections. while there have been concerns about the adequacy of inspections of imported fish in the past, do we need usda inspection, too? >> we would say there is food safety concern. >> no. a catfish is a catfish is a catfish. it's a safe food. >> reporter: david acheson is one of the country's foremost food safety experts who says catfish is not a high risk food and the fda should continue to be in charge of inspecting it. >> the on
CBS
Aug 28, 2013 5:30pm PDT
a century in the making. edith hill cannon grew up in the '60s in mississippi. >> as much as my parents tried to protect me, you couldn't escape discrimination. >> reporter: do you ever forget the discrimination? >> uh-huh. no. >> reporter: she listened to a who's who of celebrities and politicians including the daughters of two presidents, lynda johnson robb and caroline kennedy and two former presidents, jimmy carter and bill clinton. >> this march and that speech changed america. they opened minds, they melted hearts and they moved millions. >> reporter: the event included a recreation of the 1963 march through the streets of washington that ended at the lincoln memorial. setting up a nearly five-hour program under cloudy skies and periodic rain. congressman john lewis returned today, the only speaker here to share the stage in 1963 with dr. king. >> this moment in our history has been a long time coming but a change has come. >> reporter: bill tate says he was here, too, 50 years ago. that day when dr. king made that speech, what were you thinking then? >> i knew we were in a moment
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 7:00am EDT
on to help a student at howard and quote came out for students to go to mississippi because of the work that was going on there. i had seen some -- i had attended a deposition in washington and folk from mississippi and things they had suffered. this elderly man, hartman, talked about what happened on the bus. i was a student. all of the students were coming from all over the country. i was the black student and the student leadership at howard said we have to get there and be there with others. so i went to mississippi that summer of 1964 and i lived with a family. ms.johnson, her daughter was a teenager, june johnson and had been beaten in wynonna, mississippi. june was a strong girl. the family was strong there were about 12 children in the family. they took in three of us. two white girls and myself. host: ruth thanks for the call and thank you for sharing your story from 50 years ago. owen ullmann, we talked about your own participation. walk us through how you arrived here and why you came? guest: my parent has raised me and i'm proud of their values of stressing the importance
CSPAN
Aug 27, 2013 5:00pm EDT
. in texas and mississippi, north carolina and florida, groups are already devising creative ways to make it difficult for minorities, each of us, to vote. in texas, they have already done it. this assault on freedom should be taken as seriously as you have taken anything. any changes to our voting process should be enacted to make voices heard. just simply being able to vote. i have asked the senate judiciary committee to examine these dangerous voting suppression efforts and discuss steps the senate can make to preserve the right of every person to cast a ballot. [applause] on the day the civil rights act was signed into law, president lyndon johnson warned the struggle for equality was not nearly over. here is what he said. "those who founded our country knew that freedom would be secure only if each generation fought." now our generation of americans have been called on to the search of justice. he is sure right. those words are written -- are a reminder to a new generation that freedom must be tended to in order -- for us to grow. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable mit
PBS
Aug 21, 2013 5:30pm PDT
i was even lower than a working bee. mississippi for the first part of the summer knowing that there was lots of talk about the march on washington, not knowing if it would ever come to be but mississippi was the last of the states where there had been no demonstrations. but not mississippi. halfway through the summer, i got a call saying "it's going to happen, eleanor. and buy yard is going to do it." he said, "come on up if you want to work on the staff." byyard us are on the. states who could have organized that march. >> ifill: what do you mean? >> there were a set of skills that we had no reason to have so nurtured. there had never been a mass march on washington that anyone. there had been all kind ofmarchs march. what would it take to organize such a march with no experience, no precedent to draw from. >> ifill: no social media, no flash mobs. with only telephones and the usual old-fashioned 20th century means of communication. on.l, first it took it took someone -- and i think buyard put it all in one. he had been a pass f.i.s.edworln civil disobedience in leavenwo
Al Jazeera America
Aug 28, 2013 8:00am EDT
as the negro in mississippi cannot vote and the negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. >> there was no way to know then that it would have the impact that it has had. it's just fantastic. >> there's no way in the world we ever believed we'd live long enough to see a black president. >> congratulations, mr. president. >> i cried, because it never occurred to me that i would live long enough to see a black man become president of the united states. >> for a black man in this societies, there's always been this need to be cautious about the way you presented yourself in public, because you could end up like trayvon. i think dr. king let us understand that you still had to take the risk. i love bang black man in america, because it means that there's still hope that things can be changed without mowing down thousands of citizens the way that's happening in other parts of the world. >> it still hurts when other people don't think of you as an american, you're a black american, but you really aren't an american. if the rest of the country never sees us as americans, we'll be
Al Jazeera America
Aug 29, 2013 3:00am EDT
she wore for the 1963 march. she remembered the opposite progression in her native mississippi. >> coming no north for the marc, and the federal government on the conditions down south did, in fact, give us th the bear brd base of support. >> crediting the civil rights movement for gay lesbian rights, yet there was the recognition of unmet goals of 19th 63. >> reporter: 50 years later these marchs are repeating the same demands economic and political. jobs and justice. president obama acknowledg acknd progress had stalled. those inequities would have to be tackled in every level of society. >> the successful man who doesn't have to but pays his workers a fair wage and then offers a shot to a man, an ex-con, who may be down on his luck. he's marching. >> reporter: he talked about the politics of division that polarize the government. >> gay rights have been critical of coca-cola sponsorship of the olympics in russia. it accuses coca-cola of supporting hate because of its support of olympics. >> we go to the world's oldest film festival. >> reporter: the high octane glamour of th
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2013 10:00am EDT
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
PBS
Aug 20, 2013 5:30pm PDT
continues to impact southeast stretching from mississippi into the carolinas today. the flood level is at moderate level which is going to up the risk of flooding across this area with additional rainfall. looks like it is going to be continuing for the next couple of days. we have the monsoonal showers here but no precipitation to talk about across the area where we have red flag warnings in much of the west. take a look at the temperatures. 30s. the heat from the gulf of mexico surging. toronto looking at 32 degrees. here across europe system in the weakening trend but it is going to still impact much of the central regions as it treks towards the east. gusts, hail and thunderstorms are capable to be unleashed. but the high pressure system covering much of western and central portions here. geneva temperature up to about 30 degrees on your friday. it is going to be on the rising trend. i'll leave you now for your extended forecast. >>> and that's all for this edition of "newsline." i'm catherine kobayashi in tokyo. thanks very much for joining us.  ♪ >> the wilson forum is the
PBS
Aug 28, 2013 5:30pm PDT
was held to honor his dream. ezra brown is a saxophone player from the state of mississippi. he arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the message he brought with him? let freedom ring. ♪ brown played a traditional spiritual song that he has been listening to since his childhood. it's a piece that people in the civil rights movement sang in church to help them during their struggle. >> in the words of dr. martin luther king jr., let's keep in our heart and our mind and our soul about universal peace, equality for everyone, freedom. ♪ >> well, it reminds me that i have to be conscious of the inequalities that does exist now in the world. >> i don't know how much longer it's going to take, if it's going to be another 50 years or what, but we still got a ways to go, you know, and we still got to kind of keep the march going. ♪ >>> a series of bombs have exploded in shia muslim areas in and around the iraqi capital baghdad. the blasts killed at least 40 people. another 160 were wounded. iraqi authorities say insurgents detonated bombs in 14 places including p
PBS
Aug 20, 2013 5:00pm PDT
southeast. stretching from mississippi and into the carolinas today. and the flood level is at minor or moderate level, which is going to be upping the risk of any kind of flooding across this area with additional rainfall. but it looks like it's going to be continuing the next couple days. we still have the monsoonal showers here, but no precipitation to talk about across the area where we have the red flag warnings still in place in much of the west. take a look at these temperatures soaring into the 30s. the heat from the gulf of mexico surging up here. toronto looking at 32 degrees. well above the average range. here across europe, the system is in the weakening trend, but it is going to still impact much of the central regions as it treks towards the east. gusts, hail and thunderstorms are capable to be unleashed. but the high pressure system covers much of western and central portions here. geneva, you're actually going to see that temperature up to about 30 degrees on your friday. this is going to be on the rising trend. now for your extended forecast. >>> and that concludes t
CNN
Aug 28, 2013 10:00am PDT
of brotherhood. i have a dream that one day even the state of mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. i have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. i have a dream that one day the -- down in alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor have his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, one day down in alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. i have a dream today. i have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together. this is our hope. this is the faith that i go back to the south with. with this faith w
FOX Business
Aug 31, 2013 10:00am EDT
general. i'm from mississippi and my father worked heavily to dissect regate schools in mississippi. my mother didn't have a black high school. my father had to build it. now we have education and equality. but is there a level playing field today? >> as the reverend jesse jackson pointed out today, he said that african americans are less equal -- >> we have the first black president. but unemployment in the black community is on the increase. >> 2.6% black unemployment. versus 6.6% for whites. >> first of all, it's not just a black problem and those indices are for the black community but there are disparities in other communities, also. having said that, i think all of us have to get engaged. it's not just a government problem. one of the key points that president obama mentioned today. everybody has to get involved. when children are born out of wedlock that's not the government. some individuals need to hear what's happening at their churches. men and women need to take responsibility. in all communities. >> he's right, the reverend is right from the standpoint government is suppose
FOX News
Aug 24, 2013 10:00am PDT
person and -- i'm from mississippi. and my parents have worked aggressively in the civil rights movement. my father, reverend james, actually integrated schools in in mississippi. we had the chain gangs before my father got involved in criminal is.tice system. it takes a village to raise a child. i'm using a hillary clinton quote. even though we have come a long way from 50 years ago, we have a long way to go. as for role models, parents should be role models. teachers should be role models and schools should be role models for children. not just one person. >> thank you, both for your thoughts on this historic day as we take a look back and forward. now let's switch gears and let's talk as we mentioned in the intro about -- the affordable care act and the problems that seem to continue to plague obama care. so, debbie, what are your thoughts on the latest announcements made by the university of virginia and made by ups and they won't cover spouses and you can get coverage other places and then -- also, delta comment being the cost that they will approve as a result. >> i think people ar
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2013 6:00am EDT
for the head start association. our office is located is -- our office is located in jackson, mississippi. i've been with head start since 1980 and am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration. >> martha coven, associate director for education and community and labor at the office of management and budget which is part of the executive office of the president. so we on behalf of the present over to the budget for the number of federal agencies including education. the ministry for children and families at hhs where the head start progress. >> i'm the director of policy and planning at the office of head start within the department of health and human services and the start of the early childhood career 20 years ago in head start agency in brooklyn. so i'm really happy to be here today. >> i'm sharon parrott from the center on budget and policy priorities were on the vice president's budget policy and economic opportunity. this is the second go-round for me at the center on budget and just prior to returning in november i worked for secretaries and police at t
CSPAN
Aug 28, 2013 2:00pm EDT
teenager on vacation in mississippi. is it is a new day, but the day isn't over. the struggle for the civil rights for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago closed the books on the last century. well, when the book closes on the 21st centu
CSPAN
Aug 9, 2013 11:00pm EDT
to go south of richmond. just the way i was cultivated and mississippi was a scary place because emmitt till was murdered there. and i still remember ibm blacked and when we go together i wonder what people think and all day ever say is come back. i remember you from your service and never sure president. but i was a little gun shy with how i was brought up but we had a wonderful time. >> calling on the republican line. >> caller: with a race race, every time a black person kills a white person and it is o.k. but if a white person kills a black person they set out it is a race. it is not race all the time. we are past all that we need to except people who they are and quit complaining. >> guest: who is complaining? >> caller: the blacks always complain. >> guest: whitey think we're always explaining our circumstances? >> caller: they just complain get over the past. >> guest: you are from the south. you're from the south to the seveners get over the loss of the confederate war of the state's? >> caller: i am past that. the south lost. >> host: can you give us a little bit of your histor
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2013 1:00am EDT
hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capitol hill itself, until all of the residents of the very seat of our
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 10:00am EDT
songs. ?let freedom ring." from stone mountain of georgia, and every hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capi
MSNBC
Aug 26, 2013 10:00am PDT
on the death list in mississippi and he took it upon himself to train our children what to do in case they heard gunfire. that's exactly what they did that night. each other helped each other to the bathroom to get in the tub and my screams stopped them from completing that hiding point. but we knew, you live with death threats constantly and you adapt your life to that. you might argue, but you don't leave without the embrace. you might become angry with things that are happening around you, but it's a time of support. it's a time of pulling people together. and during that time, we had the ages divided. there were the young people and there were the older people. those in the middle were more or less teachers who were a little afraid to speak up and stand out. medgarr stood alone in that battle. he did have supporters, of course, but he was the point person and it was extremely difficult for us as a family to live with that. but you lived as though every day was going to be your last together. it sounds a little sad but that's the way it was. >> one of your themes in your speech on
PBS
Aug 27, 2013 5:30pm PDT
, in the delta of mississippi. >> and there was a line about marching through the south like sherman which had to be exercised before you delivered, isn't that right? >> it is true that i did have a line in the speech that said in effect if we do not see meaningful progress here today, the day will come, when we will not confine our marching in washington. but we may be forced to march through the south the way sherman did nonviolently. the archbishop of washington -- if i did not delete that part of the speech. and we had some discussion the evening before the march. and later someone came to me and said how is your speech and i said, we have to make some changes you have to delete something. and i remember having a discussion with mr. wilkins and i said roy, this is my speech. and i'm speaking for the young people. speaking people fresh from jails. and he sort of dropped it. and randolph and martin luther king, jr. came to me. and we met right on the side of mr. lincoln. the music was already playing. someone had a portable;÷ñ÷ typewriter. and dr. king said to me, john that doesn't sound
CSPAN
Aug 26, 2013 8:00am EDT
, mississippi. and many may relate to that. the death of those three civil rights workers there. but you also relate the fact that there was many others all across the great state of mississippi and in other southern states who sacrificed as well. and so share some of your opinions on the ideal of galvanizing the college youth. >> we followed the tradition as college students of young people and college students all over the world. when you talk about changing the social order, it is usually the young people, the young, educated people who will generally spear that particular change. -- spearhead that particular change. so we followed that same historical tradition. when, we know about the three civil rights workers who were murdered, but during that same period from june, i think, through september a total of 7 other blacks -- 27 other blacks, young black males, were murdered in mississippi. i related the you the story of two students at alcorn college who were just coming back to the campus from downtown, and two carloads of klansmen kidnapped them, and they found be their bodies, i think,
Al Jazeera America
Aug 30, 2013 9:00pm EDT
, mississippi, alabama, or in iowa along the river or other places in the midwest, we don't ask, you know, why would you want to rebuild that? we stand up for other americans. and new jersey is a donor state. we get 62 cents back for every dollar we send to the federal government. >> that was "america tonight's" adam may with new jersey's most famous resident, almost a year after hurricane sandy, governor chris christie says they must rebuild but at what cost? we will have that story next week. >>> and still to come, a real life ironman suit that's changing lives one step at a time. >>> finally tonight, technology. for most of us, that means the latest app on a smartphone, but sometimes a piece of hardware can profoundly change lives. >> it's a bionic robot called xcel, a battery powered external skeleton that give her legs the power to do this. >> are you ready? >> three, two, one... >> blastoff! >> and this. >> i'm walking, you guys! >> and even this. >> thank you. >> the technology is so cutting edge, that amanda is the first person in the united states to own one. >> the moment she stood u
NBC
Aug 29, 2013 5:30pm PDT
the gulf coast and caused massive destruction in mississippi and louisiana, and claimed so many lives in and around the city of new orleans. august 29th, 2005, forever known as the day the levees broke. fast forward to today and though there's been a massive rebuilding effort, some areas still remain abandoned. but new neighborhoods are popping up, and officials say 80% of the prestorm population has returned. >>> now, the picture of a day in what might just be a first at the vatican. take a look at pope francis, who's been quite active on twitter. there he is smiling and posing for a selfie with a group of young visitors inside st. peter's basilica. the people in the group snapping pictures of themselves on a cell phone. >>> we've got good news to report tonight. when folks return for their end of summer break on labor day, a good friend of ours will be coming back to work as well. brian has been given the all-clear from his doctors after knee replacement surgery just over three weeks ago. our own doctor, nancy snyderman, met up with him at the jersey shore. >> i expected a -- may i
MSNBC
Aug 28, 2013 2:00am PDT
till was found in mississippi. >>> an act of honesty caught on tape in northern new jersey. buddy's small lot was closed when a surveillance video shows four teens entering the store. instead of making off with batteries and ear phones, they leave carbon the counter, including sales tax. >> i think it's terrific that there are still people out there that have moral character not to do the wrong thing and they easily could. >> it seems a malfunctioning door lock is to blame after employees had gone home. the owners went looking for the young men to give them gift certificates, and they found them. four college football players who thank their parents. >> everything pays off. like good parenthoods and being around and showing me the ups and downs of things. you know, they showed me the right way to go. >> great group of guys there. >>> we do have some new photos of the man hunt of alleged boston bomber, dzhokhar tsarnaev. the photos show the sheer amount of manpower called in to find the suspect. the most gripping photos are from the standoff between police and tsarnaev showing him
NBC
Aug 28, 2013 11:00am EDT
, but also from stone mountain of georgia and every hill and mow hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king didn't mention in that speech but about which he later spoke of forcefully and that was the district of columbia. that's because, that's because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the sight of the capital dome. we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion. $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. but don't even get the final say in how we spend the money. and we send our sons and our daughters to fight for democracy overseas but don't get to practice it fully here at home. so today, as we remember those who gave so much a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i hope that all of you will stand with me when i say what we must let freedom ring from mt. st. al bon where rises the majestic national cathedral. and most of all, we must let freedom ring from capitol hill itself, until all of the residents of the very seat of our great democracy are truly
CSPAN
Aug 31, 2013 7:00pm EDT
, mississippi and several other places. >> julian, do you remember? >> several people supporting the march were asked to donate staff to the march and i was donated to the march on washington committee. got john's speech, the original speech -- that went to members of the press who were seated down below lincoln. i passed out the copies of john's speech. i pointed out to them that john would be the only speaker speaking that day to talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people. i thought and we thought this demonstration showed how different we were and superior we were to the other civil rights organizations. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? vix i meant aggressive. i did not mean anything harmful. i have always been upset by people who say "oh, you are so militant." it is not equate abu with violence. it just means someone aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. i thought we were more militant than the other groups gathered there. >> what was the magic of dr. king? martin luther king jr., more than any other leader of our times, had the capacity and the to define, but
CSPAN
Aug 29, 2013 5:00pm EDT
meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your remember? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to member of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talked about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equatable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we thought we were more militant than
MSNBC
Aug 24, 2013 12:00pm EDT
in mississippi could not vote and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislative codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied, but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought for us to have the precious right for us to vote for us to sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished. we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights acted protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant theft of the black vote. paramount to martin luther king junior's fervent dream was the commitment that african-americans gained full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today with 12% unemployment rates in the african-american community and 38% of all children of color in this country living below the level of poverty, we know the dream is far from being realized.
CNN
Aug 24, 2013 8:00am PDT
of the -- and i came up from mississippi where i had been working with the student nonviolent coordination committee in the mississippi delta, and i was standing right up there near the lincoln statue where the people are gathered all on the steps then. i guess post 9/11, you can't have them so close, and i remember that the best view was not when i would come down and look up. the best view was when i would look out and see that the march, which had a lot of doubt hanging over it, would people really come, because there had never been a mass march on washington before for any cause. would they come? how would they be received and here, i could not see the end of the people. march by any measure had been a success, more people for any cause had gathered on this space 50 years ago. >> we thank you for taking the time now to help us remember that day 50 years ago and educate many of us who don't remember it, but know of its power in the history books. thanks so much. our live coverage of the march in washington continues next hour. former d.c. mayor, marian berry, will be joining us live. he
CNN
Aug 26, 2013 11:00pm PDT
that stretched across texas, mississippi, alabama and georgia. david mattingly is "out front" on this story. hi, david. what did investigators find? >> well, first of all, they found 367 dogs. over 100 of them just in one single location. they have arrested ten men, seven of them came from the state of alabama. but this goes beyond just fighting dogs and the atrocities involved in that. they're looking at what they seized here in terms of money. they seized a half million dollars in this raid on friday that shows you just what big money is being had at these dogfighting operations. now, they also believe that some of these defendants may have been gambling as much as $200,000 on a single dogfight. again, showing you what kind of money was involved in these operations so doing much further than just dogfighting. they're also looking at illegal gambling operations and what sort of organizations might be out there associated with this. >> that is big money. what will happen to these dogs? >> well, right now, they're in emergency shelters. they're being cared for. they're getting medical treatment,
Al Jazeera America
Aug 28, 2013 6:00pm EDT
rights movement. on june 12th mississippi's naacp field secretary medgar evers was murdered outside his home. dr. king delivered his famous i have a dream speech and on july 2nd, 1964, about the johnson signed the civil rights act of 1964, the most sweeping civil rights legislation since reconstruction. both dr. king and his father led the congregation at ebeneezer baptist church. the current pastor of that church reverend dr. rafael joins me. >> good to be with you tony. thanks so much. >> give us your reflections of this day and move on from there. >> it's been an exciting day and a thrilling week, as we gathered on the mall remembering that great day 50 years ago, i'm a part of the post-civil rights generation, born a decade after dr. king's death. but for americans across the nation dr. king's words that day with his soaring oratory, our right to remember it but our challenge today is to make sure that while we engage in commemoration we move from commemoration to recommitment that we ensure that we do not cash in the dream for sentimental memories, dr. king came to the capital with
Al Jazeera America
Aug 28, 2013 10:00pm EDT
as a community were off of a very hard fought battle in birmingham, in albany george. >>, in mississippi, in alabama, people were struggling to have the right to citizenship, the right to vote, the right to public accommodations. people were being jailed and this was a culmination of those efforts to come to washington and petition the federal government to intervene and insure that in fact all citizens have equal treatment. >> annie, you were there, too, 50 years ago. again, you were there today for the march today. how did being there in 1963 impact who you became no. >> it changed my life. i was 17, and i had a summer job. i was on my way to college and i realized that there were people all over the country who i was aworking class examined kid of immigrant parents but still had this genetic advantage and needed to go down and say i'm standing with everyone else, because it was so important. i went into college thinking i would be a high school english teacher and i said no, i needed to go into journalism to stand up, bear witness and maybe make a difference. >> martha, you've written
FOX News
Aug 30, 2013 2:00pm PDT
, what happened to emmitt till, august 28th, 1955, that this kid visiting mississippi from chicago was said to have wolf whistled at a 21-year-old white woman, carolyn bryant, then goes back to a shack where he is staying with a distant uncle, great uncle, and three or four days later the woman's husband comes in the night with his stepbrother, drags him out of bed. they spend the entire night beating emmitt till to a pulp, to a pulp, then they take him out, shoot him in the head, then take his bullet ridden beaten body, wrap a cotton gin, throw it in the talahatchie river. how is that the equal of what happened between george zimmerman and trayvon martin? i don't know. but people think somehow with their grievance agenda it is. it lessens the credibility of today's civil rights movement. greg? >> you know what, i didn't need a civil rights movement, i'm just a white guy. maybe there will be one for short white people that smoke, i don't know. it is hard for me to say. i do believe there's kind of a battle for survival in this movement and a movement should police itself. how did
FOX News
Aug 26, 2013 12:00pm PDT
. make no mistake, president obama believes there mississippi be accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons against the world's most vulnerable people. nothing today is more serious and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. thank you. >> i'm trace gallagher in for shepard smith. just heard secretary of said john kerry giving his first accounts of the crisis in syria. the secretary delivers litany of what they believe is the proof that chemical weapons were used in syria. as important as what he laid out is what when he did not lay out, is a time line of dealing with syria, going after the regimes. what the did lay out there have to be consequences for any action, any chemical weapon used and said the president at some point in time will decide what to do but made it very, very clear the secretary of state believes there will be some type of action used against sirra, but keep in mind, we have u.n. inspectors on the ground, and seemed to indicate that did not matter. the inspectors would fine there was the use of chemical weapons but could not determine
MSNBC
Aug 28, 2013 1:00am PDT
hill of mississippi. you know that portion of the speech, right? at the 50-year anniversary of that moment at 3:00 p.m. tomorrow, bells are going to ring in d.c. and across the country and even apparently in places as far away as switzerland and japan. that's tomorrow afternoon. here's the other thing you need to know for tomorrow, though. even if you're not in a place where you can watch tv during the day, take a note of this for tomorrow night. this is something that never happens. tomorrow night, wednesday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern, msnbc has moved heaven and earth to get permission to air the "i have a dream" speech uninterrupted in its entirety. you think you have heard the whole speech, but you really probably haven't. access to the tape of the speech is very, very highly restricted. it is almost impossible to get permission to play even any large piece of it, let alone the whole thing. but tomorrow here on msnbc, at 8:00 p.m., we have moved heaven and earth to be able to play "i have a dream" uninterrupted in full. you should plan to not miss it. this is not somethin
MSNBC
Aug 29, 2013 1:00am PDT
lou in greenwood, mississippi, james orange an activist in birmingham, alabama. jose williams. i thought of those people, i thought of baker, and so when i thought of them, i began to cry. i began to cry, because i knew that there contribution had changed america, by the way, i said this directly to the president of the united states. i reminded him yesterday when i had the honor to see him in the reception, even when he was out in california. i -- and you know, he knows this, that when he was elected, for example and there were several people at a faculty home celebrating the election of barack obama. and people in the room started to cry, and someone said to me, professor jones, did you think you live long enough to see an african-american elected president? i said no. but excuse me, my tears are not for the election of barack obama's president. my tears are for all of those persons that i personally knew, personally knew -- i called them wintertime soldiers, who made his election possible. and the president today and even earlier, he reflected that in the very poignant and mov
PBS
Aug 26, 2013 5:30pm PDT
. you saw selma in the 1965 voting rights act. you saw the mississippi summer project in the 1964 civil rights bill. you saw affirmative action, you saw all of these things grow out of that. you saw an effort to empower marginalize eed people across te country. we used the model we were using in terms of organizing and sex-determination pulling people together so they could take control of their own lives. those models were actually both things that grew out of the movement. washington is one of those epic points that there are a number of other epic points that actually pulled this whole process together. i think it's important to understand that even on the struggles on the march on washington, get the message out. >>ifill: we are still having big national conversations as they say about race, still coming out of the trayvon martin episode. and i wonder as you look back we wonder whether it's leadership that's missing, whether we're just not honest as a people in discussing these issues or whether we've come much further than they give us credit for? >> i think we have come a long way
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